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Rendering

VCL at EGSR 2019

VCL at EGSR 2019

A staggering six papers affiliated with the VCL were presented at the Eurographics Symposium on Rendering in Strasbourg, France last week. All bore the name of VCL Director Wojciech Jarosz, who co-presented his work “Orthogonal array sampling for Monte Carlo rendering” with advisee and recent Bachelor’s graduate Afnan Enayet. In addition, VCL PhD student Kate Salesin presented her work “Combining point and line samples for direct illumination” and past VCL postdoc Gurprit Singh presented his work “Fourier analysis of correlated Monte Carlo importance sampling” at the conference.

Two VCL papers to be presented at SIGGRAPH 2019

Two VCL papers to be presented at SIGGRAPH 2019

Two new studies continue a long thread of research from the VCL on estimating how light bounces around light-scattering environments such as smoke or fog. The results will be presented at SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles this summer.

Would a sample by any other name smell as sweet?

Would a sample by any other name smell as sweet?

A new study led by Gurprit Singh of Dartmouth’s Visual Computing Lab presents an in-depth exploration of sampling strategies commonly used to create computer-generated images. This research highlights some previously unknown strengths and weaknesses of those strategies, and proposes a few simple tricks to tame their weaknesses.

Let’s Do the Time Warp Again

Let’s Do the Time Warp Again

A new study co-authored by Visual Computing Lab Director Wojciech Jarosz builds on his previous work simulating how light is scattered, refracted, and reflected. Rather than assume the speed of light is infinite, as one usually would in computer graphics, this work incorporates the true speed of light in order to visualize how the light bounces around a scene filled with particles and surfaces.

New research lets artists create more realistic and controllable CGI

New research lets artists create more realistic and controllable CGI

A new theory based on the physics of cloud formation and neutron scattering could help animators create more lifelike movies, according to a Dartmouth-led study. Software developed using the technique focuses on how light interacts with microscopic particles to develop computer-generated images.