Emily Whiting Awarded NSF Grant: CISE Research Initiation Initiative

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Emily Whiting Awarded NSF Grant: CISE Research Initiation Initiative

Prof. Emily Whiting was awarded an NSF Grant for her work in Structurally-Aware Computation for Geometry Acquisition and Design. The award program is under the Directorate for Computer and Information Science and Engineering (CISE): Research Initiation Initiative (CRII).

The CISE Research Initiation Initiative is part of CISE's strategy to increase its investments in the development and growth of the research capabilities of future generations of computer and information scientists and engineers. CRII awards are given to researchers to undertake exploratory investigations, to acquire and test preliminary data, develop collaborations within or across research disciplines, and/or develop new algorithms, approaches, and system designs/prototypes, which together or separately may lead to improved capacity to write successful proposals submitted to other programs in the future. 

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Post-doc Positions Available

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Post-doc Positions Available

Post-doc positions are available within Professor Whiting and Jarosz's groups. Please contact them if you are a serious, motivated and hard-working researcher with a passion to shape the future of computer graphics.

Please send your application by email. Applications should contain a CV, research statement, and references list.

Deadline: ongoing
Start date: September, 2015 or earlier upon agreement

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Exposing Photo Manipulation From User-Guided 3-D Lighting Analysis

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Exposing Photo Manipulation From User-Guided 3-D Lighting Analysis

 

We describe a photo forensic technique based on detecting inconsistencies in lighting. This technique explicitly measures the 3-D lighting properties for individual people, objects, or surfaces in a single image. We show that with minimal training, an analyst can accurately specify 3-D shape in a single image from which 3-D lighting can be automatically estimated. A perturbation analysis on the estimated lighting is performed to yield a probabilistic measure of the location of the illuminating light. Inconsistencies in lighting within an image evidence photo tampering.

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Jarosz now on JCGT editorial board

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Jarosz now on JCGT editorial board

Wojciech Jarosz has accepted a two-year term on the JCGT editorial board. 

Editors are nominated annually from among industry professionals and academic researchers who, in the spirit of the journal, have significantly advanced the field both through their own work and through service such as reviewing, public talks, conference committees, textbooks, and courses. Nominees voted in by the editorial board serve renewable two year terms as corresponding editors for JCGT. 

Congratulations Wojciech! 

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Whiting and Jarosz Join SIGGRAPH Technical Papers Committee

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Whiting and Jarosz Join SIGGRAPH Technical Papers Committee

Professors Emily Whiting and Wojciech Jarosz will both be serving on the SIGGRAPH 2015 technical papers committee

The SIGGRAPH Technical Papers program is the premier international forum for disseminating new scholarly work in computer graphics and interactive techniques. Submitted papers must adhere to the highest scientific standards. They cannot overlap substantially with any paper previously accepted for publication or under review by any conference or journal during the SIGGRAPH review process.
We are looking for high-quality research papers that introduce new ideas to the field and stimulate future trends. In addition to the core topics of modeling, animation, rendering, imaging, and human-computer interaction, we encourage submissions from areas related to computer graphics, including computer games, scientific visualization, information visualization, computer-aided design, computer vision, audio, robotics, and fabrication. This list is not exhaustive. As always, excellence of the ideas is the predominant acceptance criterion. 

Congrats Emily and Wojciech! 

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Assembling Self-Supporting Structures

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Assembling Self-Supporting Structures

Self-supporting structures are prominent in historical and contemporary architecture due to advantageous structural properties and efficient use of material. Computer graphics research has recently contributed new design tools that allow creating and interactively exploring self-supporting freeform designs. However, the physical construction of such freeform structures remains challenging, even on small scales. Current construction processes require extensive formwork during assembly, which quickly leads to prohibitively high construction costs for realizations on a building scale. This greatly limits the practical impact of the existing freeform design tools. We propose to replace the commonly used dense formwork with a sparse set of temporary chains. Our method enables gradual construction of the masonry model in stable sections and drastically reduces the material requirements and construction costs. We analyze the input using a variational method to find stable sections, and devise a computationally tractable divide-and-conquer strategy for the combinatorial problem of finding an optimal construction sequence. We validate our method on 3D printed models, demonstrate an application to the restoration of historical models, and create designs of recreational, collaborative self-supporting puzzles.

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